Doan Re-Signed, Simple Dispute Over Value


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By Bobby Bauders

Senior Writer/Editor

 

The Coyotes have re-signed the face of the franchise Shane Doan to a one year deal that will roughly amount to $5M a year. Doan will have a $2.5M base salary with incentives and a deferred signing bonus.

 

Deferred basically means play now, pay later. So Doan will make $2.5M this year, and will earn the rest of the $2.5M in years to come. This deferred part of the contract may have been a factor on what took so long to re-sign the veteran.

 

This deferred bonus makes sense for the Coyotes. Their cap hit for the year on Doan will still be $5M, which will help them stay near the cap floor, but will also save them money as they’re not actually paying all $5M this year. General Manager John Chayka was targeting a one year deal since discussions began.

 

Captain of the Phoenix/Arizona Coyotes since 2003, Doan has stayed with the franchise since he was drafted 7th overall in 1995 by the then Winnipeg Jets. This is Doan’s 21st season in the NHL. All of those seasons have been spent with the Coyotes organization. You can bet that commitment was highly discussed at the bargaining table.  Doan also received calls from various teams around the league, and he told them not to waste their time, as there was no doubt he’d be a Coyote next season.

 

Doan is coming off a four-year contract worth $21.2M that expired July 1st. He’s also coming off arguably his most productive season yet. Doan scored 28 goals and 47 points in 72 games last season. Doan led the team on the ice, and off the ice as well, as his value stretches far beyond the on-ice product.

 

Doan holds many franchise records with the Coyotes including: 1466 games played, 396 goals scored, 945 points earned, and 125 Power Play goals scored.

 

This re-signing is good news to Coyotes prospects Dylan Strome and Christian Dvorak, who will likely make the jump to the NHL next season. Doan is very well known for his leadership (hence the ‘C’ on his chest), and will be good mentors to the young players.

 

Doan reportedly played a big role in signing Alex Goligoski. He sold Goligoski on what the team stood for, the future, what it’s like to be a Coyote, etc. Doan is also credited with ending the 2005 lockout by bringing a voice of reason to the bargaining table. With Doan’s leadership and experience in negotiations, we may see Doan have a continued presence with the Coyotes on the coaching staff or in management.

 

In 2012, Doan could’ve easily signed with a Stanley Cup contender, won the Stanley Cup, and ride off into the sunset hoisting Lord Stanley. Instead, he chose loyalty, and stayed in Arizona. Even now, there was no doubt of him staying with the Coyotes.

 

The main reason it took so long to get Doan’s contract finalized was a simple disagreement on value between the two parties. Not an offensive disagreement by any means, Doan just felt his performance last season in goals should garner a higher salary.

 

“I feel the market that is set for me is different from what they think the market is, and that’s really the extent of it. Nobody’s mad at each other. We just have a different view. They’re saying ‘you’re a 40-year old player. There’s not really a market for you.’ I’m saying. ‘I led the team in goal scoring. There is a market for that,” Doan said in an interview.

 

There’s  nothing wrong with taking the time to iron out the deal. Both parties knew Doan wasn’t going anywhere, so they had time to spare, and used that time to make sure the contract was fair for both sides.

 

At the end of the day, Shane Doan is still a Coyote, and likely will be his entire life. When he decides to retire, you can bet he’ll be the most revered player in franchise history.

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